Saturday, July 06, 2013

365 Days of DC House Ads, Day 187: Meet your new Justice League Cosmos starting lineup


House ad for Cosmic Odyssey #1 (November 1988); printed in Detective Comics #591 (October 1988)
Ad art: pencils by Mike Mignola, inks by Carlos Garzon (?), colors by Steve Oliff

Today in Comics History: Catwoman begins to regret inviting the Joe Chill family to her wedding



Panels from "Terror Train!" in Batman #345 (March 1982), script by Bruce Jones, pencils by Trevor Von Eeden, inks by Pablo Marcos, colors by Tom Ziuko, letters by Todd Klein

Captain Tootsie Month, Day 6: That bear from Day 1 seeks revenge


"Captain Tootsie in the North Woods," printed in The Adventures of Bob Hope #8 (April-May 1951 ), by Bill Schreiber

Today in Comics History: Comic book artist figures out a way to give all his girlfriends a cameo appearance


Panel from "The Man From L.E.G.I.O.N. '007: The Spy Who Fragged Me" in L.E.G.I.O.N. '95 Annual #5 (1995), script by Tom Peyer, pencils by Mike McKone, inks by Wayne Faucher, colors by Gene D'Angelo, letters by John Workman

Friday, July 05, 2013

Today in Comics History: Moe Howard's new job is working out just fine


Panels from "The Man From L.E.G.I.O.N. '007: The Spy Who Fragged Me" in L.E.G.I.O.N. '95 Annual #5 (1995), script by Tom Peyer, pencils by Mike McKone, inks by Wayne Faucher, colors by Gene D'Angelo, letters by John Workman

76 of a Kind: I'm a free born bull of the USA








76 of a Kind for 200720082009201020112012

365 Days of DC House Ads, Day 186: Have no fear, the Man of Bronze is here


House ad for Doc Savage (1988 series) #1 (November 1988); printed in Detective Comics #591 (October 1988)
Ad art: pencils by Rod Whigham, inks by Steve Montano


One of several shots by DC at the Doc Savage license, although this one has a slightly different approach (to begin with, at least). This is the "Doc and Son" series of adventures based in the current day and set up in the 1987 4-issue miniseries.

While it's not a patch on the gorgeous Doc Savage paperback cover art by James Bama, here's the lovely painted cover to Doc #1 by Eric Peterson:


Cover of Doc Savage (1988 series) #1 (November 1988), painted cover by Eric Peterson

Captain Tootsie Month, Day 5: Bend It Like Bendix


"Captain Tootsie and 'The Babe Ruth Story,'" printed in Wonder Woman #32 (November-December 1948), by C. C. Beck


Here's the movie scene referenced in the Captain Tootsie ad:


Papa Bull loved the Yankees all his life. This one's for him.

Today in Comics History: Turns out he actually meant tartar sauce



Panels from Moriarty #1 and 2 (May-June 2011), script by Daniel Corey; pencils, inks, and colors by Anthony Diecidue; letters by Dave Lanphear

Today in Comics History: The bawdy euphemism "chasing the dragon" is invented


Panel from Moriarty #2 (June 2011), script by Daniel Corey; pencils, inks, and colors by Anthony Diecidue; letters by Dave Lanphear

Thursday, July 04, 2013

Today in Comics History: Batman is sorry he hired a robot DJ for his Fourth of July party


Panels from The Brave and the Bold #103 (September-October 1972), script by Bob Haney, pencils by Bob Brown, inks by Frank McLaughlin

Today in Comics History: Pretty much business as usual in Gotham City



Pages from Batman: Arkham City: Endgame (2012 digital series #5) (June 2012), script by Derek Fidolfs, pencils and inks by Jason Shawn Alexander, colors by Lee Loughridge, letters by Travis Lahnham

Today in Comics History: The Jimmy Olsen Gang pulls its most daring heist


Panels from the Boy Commandos story "The Rise and Fall of a Gangster" in Detective Comics #137 (July 1948), pencils by Jack Kirby (?), inks by Steve Brodie (?)

Today in Comics History: Martian Manhunter dies


Splash panel from the Martian Manhunter story "The Impossible Messages" in Detective Comics #247 (September 1957), script by Jack Miller, pencils and inks by Joe Certa

365 Days of DC House Ads, Day 185: Another Fine Mess


House ad for Larry Harmon's Laurel and Hardy #1 (July-August 1972); printed in Inferior 5 #11 (August-September 1972)
Ad designed and lettered by Gaspar Saladino

Here's the cover of the one and only (literally; there never was an issue #2) DC Laurel and Hardy comic book:


Cover of Larry Harmon's Laurel and Hardy #1 (July-August 1972) pencils by Mike Sekowsky, inks by Henry Scarpelli


Today in Comics History: The Fictional President of the United States regrets his agreement to do a cameo in the movie Catalina Caper


Panel from "The Man From L.E.G.I.O.N. '007: The Spy Who Fragged Me" in L.E.G.I.O.N. '95 Annual #5 (1995), script by Tom Peyer, pencils by Mike McKone, inks by Wayne Faucher, colors by Gene D'Angelo, letters by John Workman

Today in Comics History: Before he added an additional dimension, Mr. Mxyzptlk used to be a lot easier to fool


Panels from the Roy Raymond, TV Detective story "The Genius with Super Power" in Detective Comics #227 (January 1956), script by Jack Miller, pencils and inks by Ruben Moreira

Today in Comics History: The Holiday Hijackers all suffer massive hearing loss


Panels from the Superboy story "The Holiday Hijackers" in Adventure Comics #145 (October 1949), script by Edmond Hamilton, pencils and inks by John Sikela

Captain Tootsie Month, Day 4: Geez, Mrs. Kelly, buy him some proper toys


"Captain Tootsie and the Hand Grenade," printed in World's Finest Comics #19 (Autumn 1945), by C. C. Beck and Peter Constanza


Remember, kids, when celebrating the Fourth of July by throwing hand grenades, be sure to throw them away from, not towards, your friends!


Today in Comics History: Johnny Everyman means well but OH MY GOD PLEASE STOP CALLING HIM BONGO, JOHNNY


Panels from the Johnny Everyman story "The Spirit of '46" in World's Finest Comics #26 (January-February 1947), script by Jack Schiff, pencils and inks by John Daly

Happy Independence Day, all the citizens of the Republic of the Philippines! And on behalf of us here in the lower eastern 48, I humbly apologize for Johnny Everyman and the name "Bongo."

Today in Comics History: Spider-Woman suspects the color tone is off on her Avengers movie DVD


Panel from Spider-Woman (1978 series) #7 (October 1978), script by Marv Wolfman, pencils by Carmine Infantino, inks by Steve Leialoha and Al Gordon, colors by Glynis Wein, letters by Rick Parker

Today in Comics History: Smallville, Kansas is destroyed


Panel from "The Holiday Hijackers" in Adventure Comics #145 (October 1949), script by Edmond Hamilton, pencils and inks by John Sikela

Well, that'll happen on the Fourth of July


Page from Spider-Woman (1978 series) #7 (October 1978), script by Marv Wolfman, pencils by Carmine Infantino, inks by Steve Leialoha and Al Gordon, colors by Glynis Wein, letters by Rick Parker

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Today in Comics History: C. W. McCall gets the inspiration for his hit song


Panel from Spider-Woman (1978 series) #7 (October 1978), script by Marv Wolfman, pencils by Carmine Infantino, inks by Steve Leialoha and Al Gordon, colors by Glynis Wein, letters by Rick Parker

Today in Comics History: Clark plans his neck-snapping holiday


Panel from "The Holiday Hijackers" in Adventure Comics #145 (October 1949), script by Edmond Hamilton, pencils and inks by John Sikela

365 Days of DC House Ads, Day 184: Where's Flop?


House ad for Leading Comics #24 (April-May 1947); printed in World's Finest Comics #27 (March-April 1947)
Comic cover art: pencils and inks by Otto Feuer (?)

Hey, that's a pretty impressive all-star line-up of anthropomorphinals, but where's Flop? Where, oh where, is Flop?

Oh, he's right here!:


Cover of Flippity & Flop #4 (June-July 1952), pencils and inks by Jim Davis (no, not that one)

Captain Tootsie Month, Day 3: The Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to both foxes and monsters would like to have a word with Captain Tootsie


"Captain Tootsie Battles Monster Man," printed in World's Finest Comics #11 (Autumn 1943)

Today in Comics History: The LOLcat is invented


Panel from Spider-Woman (1978 series) #7 (October 1978), script by Marv Wolfman, pencils by Carmine Infantino, inks by Steve Leialoha and Al Gordon, colors by Glynis Wein, letters by Rick Parker

Today in Comics History: It's Casual Day at the U.S. military


Panel from Spider-Woman (1978 series) #7 (October 1978), script by Marv Wolfman, pencils by Carmine Infantino, inks by Steve Leialoha and Al Gordon, colors by Glynis Wein, letters by Rick Parker

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Today in Comics History: Amelia Earhart leaves aviation job for a lucrative new career in speculative history


Page from Time Lincoln: Apocalypse Mao one-shot (November 2010); script, pencils and inks by Fred Perry; colors by Robby Bevard and Wes Hartman

Well, that'll happen


Panel from "The Reptile Girl of Metropolis!" in Lois Lane #61 (November 1965), script by Leo Dorfman, pencils and inks by Kurt Schaffenberger, letters by Vivian Berg

Today in Comics History: Criminal boss pounds table, spills water, seals his inevitable doom


Panel from Spider-Woman (1978 series) #7 (October 1978), script by Marv Wolfman, pencils by Carmine Infantino, inks by Steve Leialoha and Al Gordon, colors by Glynis Wein, letters by Rick Parker

365 Days of DC House Ads, Day 183: Jimminy, Comics Oughta Be More Fun


House ad for More Fun Comics #122 (May 1947); printed in World's Finest Comics #28 (May-June 1947)

Here's that cover in glorious full color:


Cover of More Fun Comics #122 [Jimminy and the Magic Book] (May 1947), pencils and inks by Howie Post

And another couple lovely Jimminy covers by Howie Post:



Cover of More Fun Comics #121 and 126 [Jimminy and the Magic Book] (April and September 1947), pencils and inks by Howie Post

Today in Comics History: Stark International develops up-to-the-minute computers that run on punchcards


Panels from Spider-Woman (1978 series) #7 (October 1978), script by Marv Wolfman, pencils by Carmine Infantino, inks by Steve Leialoha and Al Gordon, colors by Glynis Wein, letters by Rick Parker

Today in Comics History: Dr. Strange, Spider-Woman, and Santa Claus visit the zoo


Splash page from Spider-Woman (1978 series) #7 (October 1978), script by Marv Wolfman, pencils by Carmine Infantino, inks by Steve Leialoha and Al Gordon, colors by Glynis Wein, letters by Rick Parker

Captain Tootsie Month, Day 2: It's big, it's heavy, it's wood


"Captain Tootsie and the Log Jam Rescue," printed in Funny Stuff #29 (January 1948), by C. C. Beck and Pete Constanza

Monday, July 01, 2013

Today in Comics History: Rorschach goes hang-gliding


Page from Before Watchmen: Rorschach #1 (October 2012), script by Brian Azzarello, pencils and inks by Lee Bermejo, colors by Barbara Ciardo, letters by Rob Leigh

It's my birthday and I'll eat cupcakes if I wanna (And my Star Trek into Darkness movie review)


Panel from "The Mirrors That Predicted the Future" in Shazam! (1973 series) #4 (July 1973), script by Elliot S! Maggin; pencils, inks and letters by C. C. Beck

Well, well, well, guess whose birthday it is? (Go ahead, guess.) It's mine! (And not Billy Batson's, which is February 29th. Thank you everyone for all the wonderfully nice birthday greetings and cupcakes! Today I am turning six years old. (Which is a very good age to be!) Also, I had birthday cupcakes!



As usual on my birthday I got! to go to the movies! I chose the matinee showing of Star Trek into Darkness in 3D because I'd been eagerly awaiting it and I haven't seen it yet. Also, I wanted to see it in THREE-D! With the starships and the phasers and the tribbles and the Alice Eve in her undies flyin' out of the screen right at me and stuff.

I think the people who run the AMC Empire Cinema 25 got confused when they put up the movie poster, though, because when I entered the long corridor it was into darkness! I had to run and I was hurrying to not miss the movie and trying not to spill my small popcorn ($16.50) and medium Coke (2.3 gallons) and my box of Junior Mints and my nachos and my Dippin' Dots and I was very very lucky as I managed to run into the theater, put on my 3D glasses just as the movie started! So here's my review.


Lots of people are not happy with the re-casting of the classic roles to contemporary actors, but I thought that Leonardo DiCaprio was fantastic as Captain James T. Kirk. He captured the swagger and boldness of William Shatner, and from the Hollywood movie magazines I have read in the barber shop, reports say that DiCaprio was so eager to get the role, he shaved off his hair and bought a bouffant toupee! Now there is dedication to one's role! I've not seen such strong work of an actor to fully get into his role since Daniel Day Lewis spent all his free time acting as lincoln, or since Gary Sinese chopped off his own legs to play Lieutenant Dan in Forrest Gump.


Director Baz Luhrmann (Baz Luhrmann's Moulin Rouge, Baz Luhrmann's Strictly Ballroom, Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet) has boldly gone where no Trek director has ever gone before by apparently setting the entire movie on that planet of the 1920s gangsters that we saw in the original series. So there is magnificent costuming and eleaborate sets, although never enough moments of Spock (Toby Maguire) holding a tommy gun.


On the other hand, the themes and mood of the movie are very different than those of other Trek motion pictures. Previous films in the series are based around the ideas of "The means of the many outweigh the needs of the few," "the news of the one outweight the needs of the many," "Shakespeare was Klingon," and "Scotty apparently can't find a place to park in drydock." But Star Trek into Darkness takes its cue from its subtitle, or more precisely, half of its title, by not so much having a "trek" into "space" but examining in close detail the moral and sociological implications of a culture on the decline and the end of a grand age, and also alcoholism.


Baz Luhrmann (or, as I like to call him, Bluhrmann) potentially alienates the core center of Trek fans by not having Kirk and Co. face off against any of the traditional villains such as the Klingons, Romulans, or that guy who can only speak in metaphor. Instead he introduces a brand-new nemesis haunting the Enterprise with the spectre of omnipresent observation and universal decay: the eerie space watcher Dr. T. J. Echleburg.


In an unusual twist, the evil Doctor never actually physically threatens Kirk and his crew, but has a constant presence, even when not on screen, to loom over the proceedings. I'm not certain where Bluhrmann got the idea for this creepy villain, but all I know is I can't wait for the action figure. Maybe it's a homage to the villain in this classic Superboy tale:


Panels from "The Two Boys of Steel" in Superboy (1949 series) #63 (March 1958), script by Jerry Coleman, pencils by Curt Swan, inks by Stan Kaye

Well, despite the surprising changes in cast, setting, soundtrack, tone, atmosphere, plot, theme, and the complete lack of any scenes set in out space, Star Trek into Darkness is


Now wait a minute...

(re-looking at my ticket stub)

!

Curse you, AMC Empire Cinema 25!