Saturday, January 23, 2010

Separated at Birth: You'd think she'd learn to not take her husband to the park

Superman #243/Jonah Hex #91
L: Millie the Model #154 (October 1967), art by Sol Brodsky
R: Millie the Model #201 (April 1973), art by Stan Goldberg (?)

(Click picture to mmmmega-size)



365 Days with Hank McCoy, Day 23

New X-Men #117
Panels from New X-Men #117 (October 2001), script by Grant Morrison, pencils by Ethan van Sciver, inks by Prentiss Rollins, colors by HiFi Design, letters by Saida Temofonte



Saturday Morning Cartoon: Star Wars Uncut

Star Wars Uncut: Scene 349 from Carlo Guillot




Friday, January 22, 2010

365 Days with Hank McCoy, Day 22

New X-Men #114

Splash page from New X-Men #116 (September 2001), script by Grant Morrison, pencils by Frank Quitely, inks by Mark Morales and Dan Green, colors by HiFi Design, letters by Saida Temofonte
(Click picture to black humorsize)



Thursday, January 21, 2010

Roy Thomases of the Olllllllllld West

Quick-Trigger Western #14

Iron Man of the Old West


Sparticii of the Olllllllllld West

Wyatt Earp #15
Panel from Wyatt Earp #15 (February 1958), art by Dick Ayers


Hank McCoys of the Olllllllllld West

Wyatt Earp #15
Panel from Wyatt Earp #15 (February 1958), art by Dick Ayers


Sexual Harassment of the Olllllllllld West

Quick-Trigger Western #14
Panel from Quick-Trigger Western #14 (September 1956), art by Dick Ayers


Amazon.coms of the Olllllllllld West

Wyatt Earp #15
Panel from Wyatt Earp #15 (February 1958), art by Dick Ayers


Art Critics of the Olllllllllld West

Wyatt Earp #15
Panel from Wyatt Earp #15 (February 1958), art by Dick Ayers


Bullies of the Olllllllllld West

Wyatt Earp #16
Panel from Quick-Trigger Western #14 (September 1956), script by Stan Lee, art by Reed Crandall


Yellowbellies of the Olllllllllld West

Wyatt Earp #16
Panel from Wyatt Earp #31 (April 1958), script by Stan Lee, art by Dick Ayers


365 Days with Hank McCoy, Day 21

New X-Men #114

Panels from New X-Men #114 (July 2001), script by Grant Morrison, pencils by Frank Quitely, inks by Tim Townsend, colors by Brian Haberlin, letters by Saida Temofonte
(Click picture to 600-pound-size)



Wednesday, January 20, 2010

365 Days with Hank McCoy, Day 20

X-Treme X-Men #3
Panels from X-Treme X-Men #3 (September 2001), script by Chris Claremont, pencils and inks by Salvador Larroca, colors by Liquid Graphics, letters by Tom Orzechowski



Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Also, every time you don't cover your mouth when you sneeze, you send Aunt May closer to her grave.

Cough cough cough. Please excuse the lack of a proper post for the moment...I am a very sick little stuffed bull with a bad winter cold. Cough cough cough. Please email me some chicken soup using the comments field below.

What, you want me to get out of bed and do a real post? Oh, my aching little stuffed head! I can't do that. You know, once upon a time there was a guy, who despite being so sick that he shoulda stayed in bed:

ASM #121
All panels are from Amazing Spider-Man #121 (June 1973), script by Gerry Conway, pencils by Gil Kane, inks by John Romita Sr. and Tony Mortellaro, colors by David Hunt, letters by Artie Simek


But he didn't. And then this is what happened:

ASM #121

So there you have it: inarguable proof that getting out of bed when you're sick kills Gwen Stacy. And I won't be a part of that.

(See you in a day or two, tho'!)


365 Days with Hank McCoy, Day 19

Uncanny X-Men #390

Panel from Uncanny X-Men #390 (February 2001), script by Scott Lobdell, pencils by Salvador Larroca, inks by Tim Townsend, Larry Stucker, Dexter Vines; Danny Miki, and Scott Hanna, colors by Hi-Fi Colour Design, letters by Richard Starkings and Comicraft
(Click picture to Colossussacrificize)



Monday, January 18, 2010

"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." (Martin Luther King, Jr., letter from Birmingham jail, April 16, 1963)

Today is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. While it's a matter of concern on each and every day, today is an especially important day to reflect and act on human and racial rights. Seriously, folks, this is still a major concern today. Don't just analyze the concept as it applies to Avatar; consider, discuss, and act to work to end the ways intolerance and prejudice affects our little four-color hobby. Yes, we have come a long way in civil rights for many groups since Dr. King's work in the 1960s, and the works of those who followed him, but there's still a lot of prejudice, discrimination, and exclusion in today's society.

Or, as "The Man" so eloquently put it:

Stan's Soapbox
"Stan's Soapbox: Bigotry" printed in Marvel books dated December 1968
(this one came from Fantastic Four #81)


Give or take a few Civil Wars and Superhuman Registration Acts here and there, that spirit still resides in the contemporary Marvel Universe. Take, for example, Storm's speech in Black Panther Annual #1, which celebrates the work and the spirit of Dr. King and other workers for tolerance, equality, and love:

Black Panther Annual #1

Page from Black Panther Annual #1 (October 1991), script by Reginald Hudlin; pencils by Larry Stroman and Ken Lashley; inks by Roland Paris, Carlos Cuevas, and Jonathan Sibal; colors by Matt Milla and Val Staples; letters by Cory Petit
(Click picture to peace-size)


That's a nice bit, isn't it? Mind you, never forget that there was an issue where Storm teamed up with Martin Luther King. No, it's not another photoshopped ish of Marvel Team-Up from my "If I Ran Comics" series (although!...hmmmm)...but rather...well, let me start off this way. Remember that Planet of the Gangster Aliens?



No, no, no, not that one, but rather this one:

FF #91
Panels from Fantastic Four #91 (October 1969), script by Stan Lee, pencils by Jack Kirby, inks by Joe Sinnott, letters by Sam Rosen


Yes, it's Kral, the Skrull world where they're all cos-playing as 1920s gangsters, with some sidetrips into Ancient Rome gladiator fights that pit the Thing against Torgo.



No, no, not that one, but a giant super-strong robot/cyborg type of guy who learns about humanity from Mister Ben Grimm just in time for Reed, Johnny and Crystal to arrive on the planet, dress like extras from Bugsy Malone and overthrow the Kral government to get themselves a piece of the action:

FF #93
Panel from Fantastic Four #93 (December 1969), , script by Stan Lee, pencils by Jack Kirby, inks by Frank Giacoia, letters by Artie Simek


And 'round about now you're asking me What the Sam Scratch does this have to do with Dr. King, Bully? And that's a very good question. Y'see, eventually the Fantastic Four re-visits Kral, but it's the FF featuring Black Panther, Storm, The Thing and The Human Torch. (Poor Sue, she's always missing out on the Skrull Gangster Planet!) Except, just like Captain Kirk wondering what kind of civilization would spring up after the Enterprise left Sigma Iotia II, here we get to see the aftermath of the FF's previous visit. Yes, on Kral it's now roughly the 1960s and we have a Skrull who has taken on the identity and the ideals of...wait for it...

Black Panther #33
Black Panther #33
Black Panther #33
Panels here and below are from Black Panther v.4 #33 (February 2008), script by Reginald Hudlin, pencils and inks by Andrea Divito, colors by Val Staples, letters by Cory Petit


A group of Skrulls has begun a civilization-changing revolution against the regime of Skrull gangsters by becoming Dr. King and the only X-Man who was never on the team:

Black Panther #33


Of course the underground revolution wins and the FF escape for home, leaving plenty for room for an eventual sequel (c'mon, send the Runaways there!), but not before plenty of moral discussion and some good old fashioned arena-fighting action. It's a neat little parable, much in the vein of the better episodes of Star Trek, about how alien planets are sometimes not so different than our own—both hate and intolerance, and peace and love, can come to blows throughout the galaxy.

Mind you, as much as Storm reveres Dr. King's views, a mutant superhero and African queen (no, not this one) has gotta fight for what a mutant superhero and African queen believes in:

Black Panther #33

Anyway: to sum up, as another great man once said:




365 Days with Hank McCoy, Day 18

X-Men Annual #1
Panel from X-Men Annual #1 (1992), script by Fabian Nicieza, layouts by Jim Lee, pencils and inks by a buncha guys, colors by Joe Rosas, letters by L. Lois Buhalis



Sunday, January 17, 2010

365 Days with Hank McCoy, Day 17

X-Men #27
Panel from Star Trek/X-Men one-shot (December 1996), script by Scott Lobdell; pencils by Marc Silvestri; background assists by Brian Ching; inks by Bat; colors by Tyson Wengler, Steve Firchow, Jonathan D. Smith, and Richard Isanove; letters by Dennis Heisler



Ten of a Kind: I gotta run you see I'm under the gun/And my back is up against the wall





















(More Ten of a Kind here.)